Amanda Leigh Bryan

Amanda Leigh Bryan

Amanda Leigh Bryan

Assistant Professor

Composition: Postcolonial Studies, Anglophone Caribbean Studies, Sexuality Studies, Rhetorics of Belonging and Identity, Cultural and Visual Rhetoric, Spatial Theory, Women’s Studies, Masculinity Studies, Class Theory

Current Research

My project, Sexual Errantry, examines Édouard Glissant’s theory of errantry, defined as sacred wanderings, as a means of diminishing sexual Othering practices that occur across various sexual identity aspects. Though scholars of Caribbean literature have long examined spatial practices, such as migration, exile, and displacement, my approach focuses on embodied, everyday movements in texts by authors such as Marlon James, Opal Palmer Adisa, and Nicole Dennis-Benn. I argue that small-scale embodied movements of errantry operate to perform and to secure pluralistic sexual identities for Caribbean subjects, influenced by both root cultures and interrelations with Others.

Selected Publications

“Embodied Errantry: Aldrick’s Relational Masculinity in The Dragon Can’t Dance.Anthurium: A Caribbean Studies Journal, forthcoming.

“Tracing Errantry: Tan-Tan’s Path to Personal Survival in Midnight Robber.” Caribbean Quarterly, vol. 67, no. 4, November 2021, pp. 411-426.

“‘The thing relayed as well as the thing related’: Constructing Female Strength through Errantry in Nalo Hopkinson’s “Robber Queen” Folktales.” Journal of West Indian Literature, vol. 29, no. 2, April 2021, pp. 90-107.

“Decolonization and Mysticism in William Butler Yeats’s The Celtic Twilight and The Secret Rose.” Irish Studies Review, vol. 23, February 2015, pp. 68-89.

“Alice’s Struggle with Imperialism: Undermining the British Empire through Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.” The Final Chapters: Concluding Papers of The Journal of Children’s Literature Studies, vol.9, issue 3, Wizard’s Tower Press, London, October 2013, pp. 22-32.

Expanded Publication List

PEER REVIEWED PUBLICATIONS

“Embodied Errantry: Aldrick’s Relational Masculinity in The Dragon Can’t Dance.Anthurium: A Caribbean Studies Journal, forthcoming.

“Tracing Errantry: Tan-Tan’s Path to Personal Survival in Midnight Robber.” Caribbean Quarterly, vol. 67, no. 4, November 2021, pp. 411-426.

“‘The thing relayed as well as the thing related’: Constructing Female Strength through Errantry in Nalo Hopkinson’s “Robber Queen” Folktales.” Journal of West Indian Literature, vol. 29, no. 2, April 2021, pp. 90-107.

“Decolonization and Mysticism in William Butler Yeats’s The Celtic Twilight and The Secret Rose.” Irish Studies Review, vol. 23, February 2015, pp. 68-89.

“Alice’s Struggle with Imperialism: Undermining the British Empire through Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.” The Final Chapters: Concluding Papers of The Journal of Children’s Literature Studies, vol.9, issue 3, Wizard’s Tower Press, London, October 2013, pp. 22-32.

IN-HOUSE PUBLICATIONS

“More than Words: Analyzing Visual Rhetoric.” Rhetorical Approaches to College Writing. Eds. Berberyan, Lilit, Alicia Beeson, and Kristie Ellison. Hayden-McNeil, 2017, pp. 225-236.

“Organizing Research by Synthesizing Sources.” Rhetorical Approaches to College Writing. Eds. McGuire, Meghan H., S. Brenta Blevins, and Alison M. Johnson. Hayden-McNeil, 2016, pp. 148-53.

Courses Taught

Composition—ENGH 101

My course highlights the connections between rhetoric, public writing, and inquiry-based research. Students practice writing as a learnable skill through developing narrative arguments, research arguments, and a genre/audience revision project. The course further identifies writing as a process through scaffolded writing activities and reflective writing.

Advanced Composition - ENGH 302

My course works through the intensive process of a semester-long research project, specific to students' discipline expectations. Students practice building multiple research logs (including exigence, keywords, research questions, new offerings, and syntheses) with the goal of composing genre-specific literature reviews and audience-specific advocacy letters. 

 

Education

PhD, English, University of North Carolina—Greensboro, 2019

Post-Baccalaureate Certificate: Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, 2019

MA, English, North Carolina State University, 2013

BA, English and Sociology, University of Sioux Falls, 2010, summa cum laude

Recent Presentations

“Generic Errantry: Writing to Right Patriarchal Control of Female Sexuality in Literature.” Caribbean Studies Forum Conference, University of Belize, Belmopan, October 2019.

“Masculine Identity: Moving Through Calvary Hill in The Dragon Can’t Dance.” 37th Annual West Indian Literature Conference, University of Miami, October 2018.

“Classed Identity: Tracking Stasis in A House for Mr. Biswas.” Caribbean Studies Conference, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI, April 2018.

“‘The thing related as well as the thing relayed’: Female Strength and Knowledge in ‘Tan-Tan the Robber Queen’ Folktales.” Caribbean Studies Forum Conference, University of Belize and East Carolina University, Belmopan, March 2018.